Insta-Photo: How teenagers edit their real faces for the gram

Everyone wants that perfect insta-photo, no doubt. But the extent to which teenagers nowadays are going to get it, is alarming. In a short series by Rankin, called ‘Selfie Harm’, a number of teenagers show how far they’d go to ‘look flawless’. And honestly, it’s shocking!

 

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EMMA, AGE 16 #SELFIEHARM by @rankinarchive for @visual.diet _____.

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This latest photo series has revealed how much people crave to look good on social media. So much so that the trend is growing among teenagers too. Selfie Harm, the project, was created by British top photographer, Rankin.

Fourteen teenagers in total were featured in this exercise. After Rankin shot them, they each got a chance to edit their images. And surprisingly, no one declined the offer.

In fact, each of them finished their edits in as quick as five minutes! That’s how quick people can totally change their image to feel accepted on social media. Take a look at some of the results.

 

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Insta-Photo: How teenagers edit their real faces for the gram

From slimming down faces, to adding makeup and clearing spots, the photos were easily made ‘social media ready’. These pretty much sums up how crazy the world is getting.

Also, it shows how deep FOMO — ‘Fear of Missing out’, is growing. Young people are under so much pressure to look a certain kind of way.

Rankin explained in his Insta post, his motive for this exercise.

“It’s time to acknowledge the damaging effects that social media has on people’s self-image”, he wrote.

“People are mimicking their idols, making their eyes bigger, their nose smaller and their skin brighter, and all for social media likes”.

 

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Most of the females, however, preferred their original images to the edits

Interestingly, Rankin revealed that after they’d had their chance to edit, most of the teenagers chose to stick with the originals.

Nevertheless, he still found it startling that they all had something to alter– no matter how little.

“I found it disturbing how big even the small changes are,” Rankin told INSIDER. “It’s so simple, almost like creating a cartoon character of yourself.

“It’s just another reason why we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia”, he continued.

The photos are part of an exhibition called Visual Diet, a project by M&C Saatchi, Rankin, and the MTArt Agency. It was designed to “explore how the images we consume affect our mental health”, according to the INSIDER.

Someway somehow, Visual Diet thinks the rise of influencer marketing caused this

“In the age of the influencer, we’re increasingly force-fed thousands of images every day. Hyper-retouched, sexually gratuitous bite-sized images are served up fast and fleeting. They often leave us feeling hollow and inadequate”, they said.

Visit their website for more details on the Selfie Harm project.

Meanwhile what are your thoughts? Are we avoiding the elephant in the room? Or we should just let the youngsters be, as this is their generation?

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Amanda Lucy

AMANDA IS A 25 YEAR OLD COLLEGE GRADUATE. LOVES MUSIC,DANCE AND IS AN ARDENT USER OF THE INTERNET. YOU CAN FOLLOW HER INSTAGRAM @nana_yaba. SHE STARTED WRITING FOR INFLEUR IN NOVEMBER 2017

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