Kellogg’s reveals its approach to solving influencer fraud

Influencer Fraud is a rising phenomenon and several firms and networks have suggested ways to combat it. Joining the team of problem solving, is world-famous food brand, Kellogg’s. The brand has said it does not pay influencers anymore for their reach. With this approach, it reduces influencer fraud to its minimal.

Kellogg’s has taken one of the most interesting decisions ever–not paying influencers per their reach. According to them, they have no way of knowing if the engagement is real or fake, so why pay based on that?

The practice of buying followers, likes and even comments, have become a very common thing. Many platforms have developed algorithms to help expose these fake accounts, with Instagram itself recently announcing a new plan of flushing them all out. However, Kellogg’s wants none of that.

Joshua Harper, social media head at Kellogg’s has explained more

Speaking at Digiday’s Brand Summit in Monaco this week, Mr. Harper said that the company searched deeper for a better way to measure influencer impact. He added that this decision came after agencies hired by Kellogg’s to investigate influencer fraud, also experienced fraud themselves!

“One agency we work with said a campaign was a success because it generated loads of comments, but when we dug deeper into the report, we realized that the influencers we’d paid had just gone to a WhatsApp group of other influencers and asked them to make all of those comments,” revealed Harper.

 

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“Some of the agencies helping us to manage influencers have started small but grown quickly so they don’t know how to deal with big clients, which has meant we’ve had to pressure them, he added. “It’s something which we’ll be working closely with agencies to help resolve.”

In terms of statistics, Joshua said that a review of micro-influencers they’d hired, revealed that 12% of those with 20K followers, had followers out of their intended target area–the UK.

Kelloggs reveals its approach to solving influencer fraud

Due to inconsistencies like these, Joshua highlighted on their new resolution.
“We’re trying to move away from being solely reliant on vanity metrics and take into account the sentiment of posts as well as the different types of conversations happening around them,” he explained.

“We don’t buy social media ads based on reach anymore because it can be easily faked”

He further listed a number of factors they’d now be considering– tone of voice, content style and follower demographics. “The company is now focusing on finding influencers who are genuine users of the brand or product. To do that, the advertiser is working with agencies that have the technology to find those potential influencers”, Digiday reported after the event.

Although this new approach is in its beginning stages, Kellogg’s is confident that it would be successful.

Amanda Lucy

AMANDA IS A 25 YEAR OLD COLLEGE GRADUATE. LOVES MUSIC,DANCE AND IS AN ARDENT USER OF THE INTERNET. YOU CAN FOLLOW HER INSTAGRAM @nana_yaba. SHE STARTED WRITING FOR INFLEUR IN NOVEMBER 2017

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